Cords. Cords. Go Away.

Cords. Cords. Go Away.

If you’re like me, cords drive you nuts. When you can see them. When they’re a bunched up mess. When you have to untangle them. I shake my fist at you, cords. In the case of my bedroom TV, I had two icky cords to deal with. The power cord from the tv and the hdmi cable going to my cable box. And of course, the hdmi cable we were given is super long.

cordsbefore

Yeah, not having it. The “dresser” is from Ikea and is meant to be used as a shoe holder in an entrance area. But, because I needed a slim design, I decided to use this in my bedroom for socks and undies. Perfect height. Perfect depth. Thank goodness the cable box is just as wide as the dresser or I’d be doing another DIY blog about that! So, I’m a fan of cord management and any product that helps me achieve that. Enter this lovely kit from Home Depot.

cordpackageI can’t remember the actual price for this, and I don’t see it on their website, but I’m pretty sure it was around $25 for the whole kit. That seems like a lot, but you do get a good amount of product in one package. In fact, this kit has stretched to other uses like hiding lamp cords, computer desk cords and so on. You get an impressive assortment of elbows and channels so you can make it work for whatever your needs are. I still have some left over, so it was a good buy. And it’s paintable! So first thing to do is arrange the cords as I need them, which for me meant pulling the unit a little bit from the wall so I could get to the cords and give myself enough room to slip the cord cover behind the dresser.

OPENDRAWERSAfter removing the two top drawers, I pulled the cords down to straighten them out and hide any extra. This Ikea wonder works great for this, because there’s room behind the back panel to store that extra cord madness. The next thing to do is measure how long of a piece you need.

measing13.5″ was the magic number for this one. A little extra at top and bottom to make sure you don’t see the cables coming out at either end. A few swipes with an Exacto knife and then you can pretty much bend and work it until it comes apart. Very simple.

PEEL&STICKThis is the great part! NO drilling. Just peel off the protective paper off the sticky part and put it where you need it. It holds really great, but it also doesn’t ruin your walls when you need to pull it off. When you’re ready to put it up, just pull your cords to one side and carefully place your channel in its spot. Some guide marks to make sure it’s level couldn’t hurt.

CORDHIDDENOne thing I didn’t take a pic of is how you hide the cords in the channel. The front panel is a snap-in-place gizmo. So you just snap it open, tuck in your cords and snap it closed. Easy! You could leave it the color it is (they do come in a few different shades) but if you want a nice seamless look, grab some of the wall paint you have left over (you do have some left over, right?) and do a light coat over the cord cover and it now better blends in with the wall.

afterNO MORE CORDS! Cue the fireworks. Cue the marching band. Cue the release of balloons. Now that’s a look I can get used to. These kits are great to run along the baseboards of any room and run your cords through them. And you can paint it the color of the wall or if you run it on the baseboard, you can paint it the color of the baseboard. So many choices! What are your tricks for hiding cords and cables and yucky stuff of that nature? I long for the days of a completely cordless home. A girl can dream.

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